John BOATRIGHT[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48]

Male 1838 - 1913


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  • Born  3 Nov 1838  Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Died  27 Jan 1913  Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried  Hawhammock Baptist Church Cemetery, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • John BOATRIGHT, the seventh child of Lacy Bishop and Reubin Boatright, was born on Saturday, 3 November 1838, in Emanuel County, Georgia. From the time of his birth, John lived in a world of rising tensions on the national political front, stressful relationships with Georgia?s remaining Indians, national economic uncertainty and instability, and a deep depression in the state of Georgia. He was born in an era of insatiable desire for more land to grow cotton and to gain access to the gold found on Indian lands. He was born in a time when it was acknowledged that ?all men are created equal,? but Indians were forcefully removed from the state while African-American slaves worked on lands adjoining the ?Trail of Tears.? It was a time of greed, ruinous speculation, threats of disunion, incompatible moral and political philosophies, and an untethered emotional excess that eventually engulfed his universe.

      As a child, John was somewhat insulated from the adult stimulated turmoil by being reared in a very rural ? ?backwoods? ? farm environment. In the 1850 census year, Emanuel County was one of the least populated counties in Georgia. It had a population of only 4,577 and of that total 962 were slaves. In addition to the small population, only five of the inhabitants was born out of the country: two in Germany, one in England, and two in Ireland. Of those born in other states, 119 were born in North Carolina, 101 in South Carolina, one in Alabama, one in Rhode Island, three in Virginia, two in Maryland, and one in Connecticut. The result was a homogenous population; it was primarily ?Georgia born; Georgia bred.?

      That ?sameness? also was apparent in the occupations of Emanuel?s breadwinners. Virtually all of them were farmers. Other than farmers, there were three merchants, two blacksmiths, one shoemaker, one physician, 16 mechanics and eleven school teachers ? only 33 men whose primary occupation was not farming. Several of these 33 men were relatives of a farming head of household and lived on a farm.

      The birthplaces of slaves is not known, of course, but all of them were owned by 168 individuals of whom some 22 percent owners were born in other states. Many of the slaveowners lived along the Ogeechee River and Canoochee Creek and often they were related, as well as usually having larger land holdings. The only Boatright family owning slaves was John?s older sister, Mary Ann, who was married to John T. Burt. Nonetheless, whether the Boatrights owned slaves or not, they were influenced by the culture and politics of the slaveowners.

      Most of this native-born population lived on 511 farms where almost ever family owned a horse, a milk cow, a few hogs, some chickens, and probably a few sheep. They grew corn, sweet potatoes, cotton, peas and beans, and other garden crops. There were few large cash crops or products but wool, cotton, hogs, beef cattle, and timber were the major income producing sources. Rice was grown in the swampy areas for personal and local use.

      There were only eleven public schools and eleven teachers who taught a total of 202 pupils. Most of the teachers probably received only an elementary level education themselves, so reading and writing and basic math made up the course work. Public schools were in session for a few months in the year when children were not needed in the fields and they were attended by students whose parents were willing to declare themselves poor. No private schools were organized in Emanuel County, but tutors probably were hired by the wealthy and by several families who shared the expense. There were no public libraries of any kind. So, education in this time period was basic. While over 16 percent of the adults were illiterate, it is surprising that the illiteracy rate was not higher.

      Churches numbered only 17: 14 Baptist (of different kinds) and four Methodist with accommodations for 2,025 people. Churches were small and mostly depended on knowledgeable members or circuit preachers for services. Monthly or bi-weekly services were held and tended to be all-day affairs by most churches. Many of the churches staggered their services so as not to conflict with services held by other churches. This allowed families to attend other churches in addition to their own, if they were so inclined. Nonetheless, only about half of the population attended church and even fewer were members but all were affected in some degree by the area?s Protestant churches.

      Transportation was primarily by foot or horse on dirt roads that were not well kept, nor well funded. In rainy weather they could be impassable. There were few road arteries in and out of the county and they followed previously established Indian routes. Most of the local roads were little more than paths and landowners along the roadway were responsible for maintenance. Goods also were transported on the rivers or by the railroad that ran through Millen.

      The geographic isolation of Emanuel County, its sparse settlement, and its homogeneous people made John?s family and neighbors the focal points of his life. He had no experience with different cultures outside of his community, and external influences were few and limited to an occasional stranger and scarce reading materials.

      John played and worked with his siblings and other children in his neighborhood. Some children of his age who lived near him included Thomas Kersey, Edwin Alderman, Thomas Warren, and Allen Dickson; he probably interacted with them at various times and in different ways.

      His older sister Mary Ann Boatright and her husband, John T. Burt, lived close by and other relatives were scattered around the area. Only a few relatives had moved out of the county by this date.

      His parents were adherents to the Primitive Baptist faith and they played an important role in their church?s functioning and development. This in turn laid the foundation for John?s membership in the Primitive Baptist Church.

      John learned of death and its losses at an early age. His sister Elizabeth and his brother Benjamin died very young and then he lost his mother when he was about eleven years of age. Although the family?s religion taught him that there was joy in his family members going to heaven, one still can imagine that there was much pain in his personal loss.

      The first extant record of John?s life began with his inclusion in the 1850 Emanuel County census. He was recorded then, age 11, in his father?s household with his family. No other personal record has been located that illuminates his childhood.

      For his first wife, he married Adaline Melvina Pierce, daughter of George Pierce, on 17 April 1859 in Emanuel County. According to a newspaper announcement on Wednesday, 27 April 1859, they were married by Judge B. E. Brinson at the residence of Reuben Boatright.

      Adaline was born 10 January 1840 in either Burke or Emanuel County, Georgia. There seems to be no certainty as to her birthplace as of this date. She was the sister of George Pierce, who married John?s sister Annie. So, her brother was also her brother-in-law ? a common relationship in smaller communities of that time.

      John and Adaline had the following children:

      i. Mary Jane BOATRIGHT
      ii. Emily Angerona BOATRIGHT
      iii. John R. BOATRIGHT
      iv. Ruben BOATRIGHT
      v. Ann Eliza BOATRIGHT
      vi. Martha Elizabeth BOATRIGHT
      vii. Nancy America BOATRIGHT
      viii. Julie R. BOATRIGHT, b. 10 April
      1871, d. 5 October 1873, buried
      in Hawhammock Church Cemetery,
      Emanuel County, Georgia
      ix. Sallie BOATRIGHT, b. 20 October
      1872, d. 5 September 1873,
      buried in Hawhammock Church
      Cemetery
      x. Joseph Harley BOATRIGHT, b. 12
      February 1875, d. 16 July 1882,
      buried in Hawhammock Church
      Cemetery

      In the 1860 census, the family was enumerated as: John Boatright, age 21, farmer, born in Georgia, $50 value of personal estate; Addeline, age 17, born in Georgia; and Mary J., age 3 months, born in Georgia. The value of his personal property was listed as $50.8 There was no listing of a value for real estate, so it is possible that he was farming with his father who lived beside him.

      John served as a Private in Co. C, 54 Georgia Infantry during the Civil War. He was enlisted in Savannah by Captain Green for a period of three years on 5 May 1862 and was paid a bounty of $50. The bounty payment indicates that he volunteered rather than being drafted. National Archives records show that he was present at the company muster roll in January and February of 1863 and in January and February of 1864. Another muster roll stated that he enlisted 17 April 1864 at Red Bluff, South Carolina by Captain Moody.

      The 54th Georgia was stationed in Georgia and South Carolina for most of the war. The regiment was at Fort Beauliue, near Savannah in the latter part of 1862, as is indicated by the deaths of several members of the regiment. In July and August of 1863 the regiment was performing duty at Battery Wagner, South Carolina. In his report of 1 August, Col. Lawrence M. Keitt, commanding Battery Wagner, stated that:

      The Fifty-fourth Georgia was stationed to-day in
      the sand hills, in reserve, and is in readiness to
      leave on the arrival of the Charleston
      Battalion.... At a quarter before 1 p.m. the enemy
      opened fire with large Parrott gun from a small
      wooden gunboat 1 to 1 miles off, and kept it up
      slowly till about 4.30 p.m. without injury.10

      The following day, when the 54th was to be relieved, Col. Keitt reported:

      About 9 p.m. or sooner, the enemy sent up a signal
      rocket from the marsh or creek far to our right,
      and immediately opened fire on steamer Chesterfield
      at Cumming?s Point, just landing the Charleston
      Battalion, and shortly two monitors, and perhaps a
      gunboat, opened fire in the same direction. The
      result was that the steamer?s crew carried her off
      precipitately, leaving the captain on shore, and
      leaving the Fifty-fourth Georgia, which should have
      been taken.

      The 54th, however, was able to leave that night. They, apparently, were in rotation with duty on Battery Wagner, Fort Gregg, Fort Johnson, and duty at other places on the mainland and were not present when the Union forces occupied the battery on 7 September.

      The regiment was ordered to Dalton, Georgia in April 1864 and, was engaged in a number of battles in and around Atlanta. They served under Joseph Johnston until he was relieved by President Davis on 17 July. During this time they participated in the battle of Resaca on 14 and 15 May 1864, and the battle of Kennesaw Mountain on 27 and 28 June. John Bell Hood, replacing Johnston, moved the troops immediately into the battle of Peachtree Creek on 20 July, followed by the battle of Atlanta on 22 July, and then the disastrous battle of Jonesboro on 31 August and 1 September, and numerous skirmishes before, during, and after these battles. The 54th participated in the major battles, and probably a number of skirmishes. As an example of the engagements around Atlanta, Lieut. Col. Cincinnatus S. Guyton, reported:

      ... about 5 p.m. on 22d of July the brigade
      (Lieutenant-Colonel Rawls, Fifty-fourth Georgia,
      commanding), under the direction of Brigadier-
      General Lowrey, moved by the left flank to a point
      near to and southwest of the Fair Ground road, and
      distant from Atlanta two miles and a half, opposite
      the works then occupied by the enemy. From this
      position we assaulted the enemy's works, carrying
      two lines. In the assault on the second line
      Lieutenant-Colonel Rawls was wounded and carried
      from the field, when the command devolved on
      myself. The enemy was at this time occupying a
      third line of works distant from the line occupied
      by us about thirty paces, both sides firing
      rapidly. The brigade was in the utmost state of
      confusion as regarded its organization, the
      regiments being intermingled with each other and
      the right of Maney's brigade. On assuming command,
      I immediately ordered an advance, but the men could
      be induced to go no farther, which I think was
      owing in part, if not altogether, to want of
      organization, officers being unable to form their
      commands under so close and deadly fire. About 9
      p.m. I reported, through Captain Gordon, assistant
      inspector-general, of Brigadier-General Mercer's
      staff, the condition of affairs to Brigadier-
      General Lowery and asked for instructions, and was
      ordered to hold the position, which was done until
      3 a.m. on 23d, when orders were received from
      Brigadier-General Mercer to withdraw and report to
      him at his headquarters. This was accomplished in
      tolerably good order.
      The casualties of the day, ending 3 a.m. 23d,
      were 30 killed, 129 wounded, and 20 missing.
      July 23, at 5 a.m. the brigade moved in position
      on the line to the right of Major-General
      Cleburne's division and commenced to intrench. July
      24, the brigade was engaged in strengthening its
      position and policing the ground.

      Hood, after the evacuation of Atlanta, eventually led the Army of Tennessee west, out of Georgia and into Alabama and Mississippi, and then headed towards Tennessee. His withdrawal from the state essentially opened up Georgia for Sherman?s March to the Sea.

      John ?Boatwright? appeared on a National Archives receipt roll for clothing at the Newsom Hospital in Cassville (in Bartow County), Georgia, on 17 November 1864. This record appears to contradict John?s pension statement that he had left his command at ?Tuscumby,? Alabama about November 1, 1864 and was sent from there to the hospital at Columbus, Mississippi before being furloughed home. The original records of the Newsom Hospital at the National Archives were consulted, but no clothing reference for John was located. However, writing in the hospital journals was very faded and difficult to read, so it is possible that his name was overlooked. Meanwhile, a ?best guess? at this time is that John was in Tuscumbia, Alabama and did go to a Columbus, Mississippi hospital as he stated in his pension application. Not all hospital records survived. In addition, it was not unusual, particularly at the end of the war, for a hospital?s location to be moved to widely separated geographic areas. A case in point is St. Mary?s Hospital which was located in several southern states at different times during the course of the war. H. H. Cunningham, author of Doctors in Gray, has noted that Southern troops most often were hospitalized in facilities operated to serve each state?s troops. Furthermore, in speaking of the near disintegration of the Confederate hospital system near the end of the war, Cunningham wrote:

      When General John B. Hood ... launched his invasion
      of Tennessee in November, a number of the hospitals
      in Georgia and Alabama were transferred by [Samuel
      H.] Stout to northern Mississippi upon request of
      Hood?s medical director that hospitals be
      established at Iuka, Corinth, and suitable points
      on the Mobile and Ohio Railroad. Transportation
      breakdowns, however, and the overall turmoil
      naturally associated with an army?s retreat almost
      disrupted the hospital service. In less than thirty
      days Surgeon William P. Harden, in charge of the
      Empire Hospital at Macon, Georgia, was ordered to
      move his organization from Macon to Tuscumbia,
      Alabama, from Tuscumbia to Corinth, Mississippi,
      from Corinth to Meridian and from Meridian to
      Opelika, Alabama.1

      Although included on his regiment?s prisoners of war roll, dated 26 April 1865, at Durham?s Station, North Carolina, John was not there. Likewise, he was officially paroled at Augusta, Georgia, on 26 May 1865 even though he was not in Augusta. At the surrender of his regiment, he was home on sick furlough. In his pension application, dated 17 August 1910, he stated that at the time his company surrendered, an enrolling officer advised him not to return to his regiment as his health was bad and all the railroads were destroyed.

      After the war, the Reconstruction Act passed by Congress required former Confederate soldiers to take an oath of allegiance to the U.S. before being allowed to vote. John was included on the 1867 returns of qualified voters. The return showed that he took the oath of allegiance and registered to vote on 14 October 1867 in the 395th precinct of Emanuel County. On the same day he took the oath ?to support the Constitution and obey the laws of the United States, and will to the best of my ability encourage others to do so.?

      After the war, John returned to farming. The first land record located indicates that he bought 125 acres of land from James B. Kennedy on 5 November 1868 and paid $375. The farm was located ?... on the south side of the road running from leading from Henry S. Brown into the road leading from A. N. Durdens plantation to #9 1/2 CRR near Thomas Kirkland plantation ... being ... on the head waters of Long Creek in the 57th district...? The deed was recorded on 15 August 1889.

      Despite the horrors of the war and its economic devastation of the South, John?s estate grew along with the size of the family. By 1870, the family was enumerated in the census as follows: John Boatright, age 31, farmer, value of real estate $3,215, value of personal estate $300, born in Georgia; Adeline, age 28, keeps house, born in Georgia, cannot read, cannot write; Hariet Wallace, age 11, born in Georgia, cannot read, cannot write; Mary Boatright, age 10, born in Georgia, cannot read, cannot write; Ann E., age 8, born in Georgia; John O., age 7, born in Georgia; Reuben, age 5 born in Georgia; Ann E., age 3, born in Georgia; Martha E., age 1, born in Georgia. The Harriet Wallace included in the household was the daughter of John?s sister, Martha, who died about 1866.
      Dorothy Woodell Woods, in her own words and with poetic license, recreates an adventuresome trip to Savannah by the Boatright extended family: an event that probably was told and retold by the participants and their children for many years afterwards. Although her story is not a literal account, it is worthy of retelling because it provides a glimpse of life far removed from modern memories.

      In July 1870 Jerry [Hooks], Lott Barwick, Joe
      Anderson, John Boatright, Eli Hendley, John Cowart,
      and probably two or three other families formed a
      wagon train to Savannah. Knowing that it would be a
      great undertaking, they met at the different homes,
      and made their plans. They had beeswax, tallow,
      goose, guinea, duck, bird, chicken and turkey
      feathers, cow hides, honey, cured hams and
      shoulders, side meat, smoked sausage and corn meal
      to barter. A few of the men had four wheeled
      wagons, but mostly the train was made up of two
      wheeled carts, and it was a tedious job to balance
      the loads. Three of the wagons were covered over
      with a covering of homespun on frames...
      Two of the men rode horseback to scout the
      route. They of course had their trusty knives and
      guns handy in the event they saw a rattlesnake or
      some other dangerous varmin. Also they provided
      rabbit and bird to cook over the camp fire the one
      night they spent on the road. The wives had cooked
      up rashins, mostly potato custard, tea and syrup
      cakes, as they were about the only food that they
      would travel with. Some ham and sausages were
      packed to fry in the iron skillets over the fires.
      They stopped about sundown a bit over half way
      to Savannah, building a large camp fire, and a
      smaller fire to cook over. They spread their quilts
      under the trees to sleep on, but the wives who went
      along slept in the covered wagons. Four of the men
      took turns guarding the train during the night. Of
      course they did not forget the ?Jug?, and the men,
      but never the wives, imbided from it during the
      trip. After feeding the mules and horses that were
      tethered near by with the fodder, hay and corn that
      they had brought along in a separate wagon, they
      sat down to a bountiful supper. Invoking God?s
      blessings on their trip, they ate heartily. Lending
      a helping hand, all soon cleaned up the camping
      ground, and soon were sleeping soundly.
      Before daylight the wives were cooking again,
      and the aroma of coffee and side meat floating on
      the morning breeze gave the men, in fact all of
      them, a wonderful appetite. They cleaned up
      thoroughly, since they meant to stop at the same
      place on their way back home from Savannah.
      As they neared the city, the entire crowd was
      almost overcome by anxiety, wondering about all the
      many things they expected to see, although they
      hardly knew what to expect. Few of them had ever
      been out of Emanuel County, let alone all the way
      down to Chatham. Of course the women were very
      quiet as the men displayed their wares for sale.
      The factors on River Street were very attentive and
      courteous as they bartered and traded and bought.
      The wives picked out the bolts of cloth, a few
      pretty dishes and bowls, a few pieces of jewelry,
      shoes and stockings. They enjoyed themselves, and
      the Savannah River was an especial delight to them
      and they stood on the docks and saw some large
      ships in the distance. They would never forget this
      trip as long as they lived.
      Some of the buyers invited all of the men and
      their families to eat dinner at a boarding house in
      town, on Broughton Street. The women were so timid
      and shy, their husbands ordered the food for them.
      Jerry had imbided freely from the bottle the buyers
      had handy, as had all the men folk. When asked how
      he preferred his beef cooked, Jerry reared back,
      and said in a loud voice, ?Oh, just cripple the
      son-of-bitch and drive him in.? Of course the
      laughter could be heard for blocks, but Missouri
      [Jerry?s wife], in relating the incident in later
      years, said she was so mortified she could hardly
      stand it.

      After the 1870 census was taken, John and Adaline had three more children: Julie R., born 10 April 1871; Sallie, born 20 October 1872; and Joseph Harley, born 12 February 1875. Adaline buried the first two of these children one month apart, in 1873.

      After giving birth to ten children and seeing two die as infants, Adaline died at the young age of 37 on 16 April 1877. Joseph Harley, the youngest child, lived only until he was seven years old. Adaline and her three youngest children were buried in Hawhammock Church Cemetery where she had been a church member.

      Although Adaline?s death was a sorrowful occasion, John had eight other children to be cared for, including the toddler Joseph Harley. The reality was that the children required a woman?s touch and helping hands. About five months after Adaline?s death, on 10 September 1877, John married his second wife, Nancy Deal, daughter of Harriet Proctor and William A. Deal. Nancy was born 11 January 1853 in Emanuel County, Georgia and had a child out of wedlock when she was about 17 years old. Family stories indicate that she refused to marry the child?s father. Whether John and Nancy?s marriage was one ?made in heaven? is unknown, but it certainly was one of immense practicality for both.

      John and Nancy had the following children:

      i. Daniel Douglas BOATRIGHT
      ii. Benjamin H. BOATRIGHT
      iii. William Matthew BOATRIGHT
      iv. Mittie Missouri BOATRIGHT
      v. Kate BOATRIGHT
      vi. Josie BOATRIGHT
      vii. Robert Lewis BOATRIGHT
      viii. Cora BOATRIGHT
      ix. Celia BOATRIGHT
      x. Thomas Pelie BOATRIGHT

      By the time of the 1880 census, the family was listed as follows: John Boatright, head, age 41, farmer, born in Georgia, parents born in Georgia; Nancy A., age 26, wife, cannot read and write born in Georgia, parents born in Georgia; John R., age 17, son, works on farm, attended school within year, cannot write, born in Georgia, parents born in Georgia; Reubin, age 15, son, works on farm, attended school within year, cannot write, born in Georgia, parents born in Georgia; Ann E., age 13, daughter, attended school within year, cannot read and write, born in Georgia, parents born in Georgia; Martha E., age 11, daughter, attended school within year, cannot read and write, born in Georgia, parents born in Georgia; Nancy A., age 9, daughter, attended school within year, born in Georgia, parents born in Georgia; Joseph H., age 6, son, born in Georgia, parents born in Georgia; Daniel, age 1, son, born in Georgia, parents born in Georgia; and Susan Deal, age 7, step-daughter, born in Georgia, parents born in Georgia.

      In addition to the lands he had bought previously, John also bought 199 acres from Michael Hooks for $200. Michael?s wife, Mary Ann Boatright Burt Hooks, was John?s older sister and the siblings had lived close to each other. After Hooks? death, the deed was dated 21 May 1883 and recorded by Jeremiah Hooks, Michael?s son and administrator, on 15 October 1894. The land was located in the 1333 GMD and was ?bounded by lands of Branch Sons Co. [,] Jeremiah Hooks & others.?

      John sold 119 acres to J. E. Cowart for $500.00. The land was located in the 1333d GMD ?... bounded, on the North, R. H. Kimball, East by J. Hooks, South, by J. Hooks, west by G. H. Brown.? The deed was recorded 11 October 1897. On 11 October 1897, James Deal sold 199 acres to Nancy Boatright, his sister, for $500.29 The property was located in the 1333 GMD ?... joining lands G. H. Brown, R. H. Kimball, & Jerry Hooks.? Then, on 15 January 1904, Nancy sold 119 acres to her husband for $500. The property was located in the 1333 GMD and was ?... bounded on the North by lands of Estate of R. H. Kimball, on the East by lands of Jerry Hooks on the South by lands of Mrs. Ada Chance and on the West by lands of the said Mrs. Ada Chance." The deed was recorded 21 December 1911. It seems that this land was traded back and forth among the Boatright family and friends.

      By 1900 John Boatright was listed as head of household in the census as: born November 1838, aged 61, married 22 years, born in Georgia, father born in Georgia, mother born in Georgia; Nancy, wife, born January 1850, age 50, mother of 11 children, 11 living, born in Georgia, father born in Georgia, mother born in Georgia; America, daughter, born August 1870, age 29, single; Benjamin, son, born August 1880, age 19; William, son, born October 1882, age 17; Missouria, daughter, born January 1886, age 14; Kate, daughter, born April 1888, age 11; Josie, daughter, female, born December 1889, age 10; Louis, son, born March 1892, age 8; Cora, daughter, born March 1894, age 6; Cela, daughter, born October 1895, age 4; and Thomas, son, born March 1897, age 3.

      John and Nancy were members of Hawhammock Baptist Church. On 22 September 1906 John was named as a delegate to meet with the Association. The following year, on 21 September 1907, he was named as a messenger to the Association. He also served on various committees.

      In the 1910 Emanuel County census, the family was recorded as follows: John Boatwright, age 71, married twice, married 30 years, farmer, could read and write; Nancy, wife, age 54, married once, mother of 11 children of whom 10 were living, cannot read nor write; Josie, daughter, age 19; Lewis, son, age 17, farm laborer, could read and write, attended school; Cora, daughter, age 15, attended school; Celie, daughter, age 14, attended school; and Tom, son, age 12, attended school.

      When John applied for a Georgia state pension for Confederate veterans on 17 August 1910, he listed his property as consisting of 119 acres of land valued at $400; two old mules worth $50 each; household goods, $50; ten head of cows, $5 each; 25 head of hogs, $1 each; and a buggy, wagon and farming implements, valued at $50. E. R. Lamb was witness to John Boatright's service; D. D. Boatright and W. J. Cowart gave affidavits of his property; and John R. Flanders, Ordinary, certified that he had paid taxes on property valued at $670 for 1908, $720 for 1909, and $697 for 1910. On 23 June 1911 he signed an affidavit that he was home on sick furlough when the war ended. Rubin Boatright, his brother, signed his mark to an affidavit to the same effect. The pension office, on 3 October 1912, stated that John failed to prove the reason why he was not with his company. It seems that his pension application was not accepted.

      Within months after this rejection of his pension, John died on 27 January 1913 in Emanuel County, Georgia. He was buried in Hawhammock Church, Emanuel County, where he had become a member in 1875.

      Nancy died 12 February 1919 in Emanuel County, Georgia, and was buried beside her husband. The church published memorials to them on the occasions of their deaths.

      Daniel D. Boatright, John and Nancy?s oldest son, was granted letters of administration on John?s estate after his mother died.
    Person ID  I16  Boatright Genealogy
    Last Modified  3 Jan 2012 

    Father  Reuben BOATRIGHT, Sr.,   b. 14 Feb 1794, Burke County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Dec 1878, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Lacy BISHOP,   b. Abt 1802, Montgomery County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1849, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  Abt 1817 
    Family ID  F6  Group Sheet

    Family 1  Adaline Melvina PIERCE,   b. 10 Jan 1840, Burke or Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Apr 1877, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  17 Apr 1859  Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    >1. Mary Jane BOATRIGHT,   b. 17 Apr 1860, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Apr 1936, Canoochee, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >2. Emily Angerona BOATRIGHT,   b. 20 Jul 1861, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Oct 1934, Canoochee, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. John R. BOATRIGHT,   b. 19 Jan 1863, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Aug 1901, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >4. Ruben BOATRIGHT,   b. 26 Jan 1865, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Feb 1947, Summit, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >5. Ann Eliza BOATRIGHT,   b. 2 Feb 1867, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Feb 1913, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >6. Martha Elizabeth BOATRIGHT,   b. 8 Nov 1868, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Jan 1905, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
     7. Nancy America BOATRIGHT,   b. 30 Aug 1870, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Nov 1939, Garfield, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
     8. Julie R. BOATRIGHT,   b. 0April 1871, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Oct 1873, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
     9. Sallie BOATRIGHT,   b. 20 Oct 1872, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Sep 1873, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
     10. Joseph Harley BOATRIGHT,   b. 12 Feb 1875, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Jul 1882, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified  13 Aug 2010 
    Family ID  F18  Group Sheet

    Family 2  Nancy DEAL,   b. 11 Jan 1853, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Feb 1919, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  10 Sep 1877  Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    >1. Daniel Douglas BOATRIGHT,   b. 7 Oct 1878, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Mar 1974, Glenwood, Wheeler County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >2. Benjamin H. BOATRIGHT,   b. 21 Aug 1880, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Aug 1951, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >3. William Matthew BOATRIGHT,   b. 17 Oct 1882, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 May 1950, Chatham County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >4. Mittie Missouri BOATRIGHT,   b. 5 Jan 1886, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Aug 1956, Savannah, Chatham County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >5. Kate BOATRIGHT,   b. 27 Apr 1888, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Mar 1952, Saluda, Saluda County, SC Find all individuals with events at this location
    >6. Josie BOATRIGHT,   b. 25 Nov 1889, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Oct 1977, Savannah, Chatham County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >7. Robert Lewis BOATRIGHT,   b. 26 Apr 1892, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Feb 1975, Swainsboro, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >8. Cora BOATRIGHT,   b. 8 Mar 1894, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Oct 1936, Candler Co., GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >9. Celia BOATRIGHT,   b. 11 Oct 1895, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jan 1971, Swainsboro, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >10. Thomas Pelie BOATRIGHT, Sr.,   b. 6 Mar 1897, Garfield, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Mar 1974, Millen, Jenkins County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified  13 Aug 2010 
    Family ID  F19  Group Sheet


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