Daniel BOATRIGHT[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77]

Male Abt 1765 - Abt 1818


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  • Born  Abt 1765  USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Military  1 Jan 1779  Georgia and South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Daniel Boatright served as a private in the 2nd Georgia Continental Battalion, Co. B, during the Revolutionary War. The National Archives military service files indicate that Daniel Boatright was on a payroll and his "Pay has been drawn to the 1st January 1779."
    A Danl. Boatwright was enlisted in Captain John Mosby's Company on 18 December 1776. He was entered on that company's pay roll, which dated from 22 August 1776 to 1 April 1777.
    It also is possible that Daniel served in the South Carolina militia because a Daniel Boatwright was paid by the State of South Carolina on 27 October 1785 for 80 days of militia duty
    for a total of five pounds, fourteen shillings, three pence, and half penny sterling. The Roster of South Carolina Patriots states that Daniel Boatwright "... served under Capt. John Chesnut in the militia and was at the fall of Charleston."
    There is at least one other published account of Daniel's Revolutionary War service. Arnold
    and Burnham state that Daniel "Enlisted in 1779 in the 3rd Continental Battalion commanded by Lt.Colonel John McIntosh. He also served in Captain John Chestnutt's Company of the South Carolina Militia and was at the fall of Charleston."
    An additional military record for Daniel, but whether it is for Junior
    or Senior is unknown. On 5 November 1812, Daniel Boatwright "Gentleman" was commissioned by the Governor as Ensign of the 49th district company of the militia. The 49th district was in Emanuel County when it was formed in December 1812.
     
    Land Ownership  4 Dec 1786  Burke County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Daniel was issued a headright warrant of 200 acres of land in Burke County "adj'g Lands of Thos. Chisolm & Benj. Brach." The warrant was issued by Thos. Lewis, the Senior Justice of Burke County, on 4 December 1786. It was surveyed on 24 May 1787 and the plat noted that the warrant was issued to Daniel Boatright "(who already resides in this State)." 
    Land Ownership  5 Dec 1791  Burke County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    On 5 December 1791 Daniel received a headright warrant in Burke County for "A tract of land which shall Contain, Two Hundred .. Acres, in the said County of Burke, Adjoining land formerly Surveyed for Cader Vineing & Hartsfield, on Harvey's Mill Branch in lieu of a Warrant heretofore granted him for the Same quantity of Acres (on Rocky Branch)." No record of a previous warrant on Rocky Branch has been located, so it is probable that it was destroyed as required by law. The warrant was surveyed on 14 August 1792 "for Daniel Boatwright who lives in This State." The tract of land was located "on a branch of Duharts Creek bounded northward by land of Vineing and Vacant land Northeast by unknown land, Southward by Survey.d land and Westward by land Supposed to have been survey.d for Hartsfield?." The warrant was advertised and certified on 4 September 1792. This land lies in present day Jefferson County, northwest of Louisville, near the juncture of State Route 88, on Louisville Road. 
    Land Ownership  31 Dec 1794  Effingham County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    On 31 December 1794 Daniel Boatwright, of Burke County, bought a tract of land comprised of 200 acres on the Great Ogeechee River in Effingham County from Joel Rees, also of Burke County. At that date Effingham and Burke Counties were adjacent, so it is possible that the purchased tract was near the 1788 land grant. 
    Residences  1795  Burke County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Daniel is recorded among the Burke Countians who, in 1795, signed a petition protesting the Yazoo land frauds. 
    Occupation  30 Apr 1796  Waynesboro, Burke County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Daniel served as a jailer (or gaoler) in Waynesboro, Burke County from 30 April 1796 through at least 3 March 1798. 
    Land Ownership  1797  Burke County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    He received another land grant of 200 acres in Burke County in 1797. 
    Land Ownership  27 Sep 1798  Bulloch County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    On 27 September 1798, Daniel, of Burke County, purchased 100 acres in Bulloch County ?formerly Effingham? from James Mizell and his wife Eleanore of Bulloch County." This tract also was located on the Ogeechee River. 
    Residences  Oct 1798  Burke County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Tax records record him as owning one slave and living in ?Waynesborough,? Burke County in October 1798. 
    Occupation  21 Oct 1799  Burke County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Daniel was elected Coroner of Burke County and received his commission from Governor James Jackson on 21 October 1799. On 18 February 1799, the General Assembly appropriated $29 for his services as coroner of Burke County,so he must have being serving as coroner prior to his commission. 
    Residences  27 Nov 1802  Bulloch County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Daniel Boatwright, witnessed a sale of land from Mark Lott to James Oglesby on 27 November 1802. 
    Land Ownership  21 Mar 1803  Bulloch County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    On 21 March 1803, Daniel purchased 200 acres in Bulloch County from David Mizell and his wife Sarah of Bulloch County. This land was located in Bulloch County adjacent to and on the south side of the 1798 purchase, and also was bounded by lands of Mizell and Lotts. 
    Residences  1805  Bulloch County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Daniel exercised his right to participate in the 1805 Georgia land lottery, but drew two blanks in this effort to obtain more free land. His residence was given as Bulloch County in extant lottery records, which meant that he was located in Bulloch County between May 1803 and 1 March 1804. The fact that he was entitled to two draws in that lottery indicates that he was married and/or had a child or children under the age of 21 years of age. 
    Residences  28 Jun 1805  Georgia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    On 28 June 1805 Daniel Boatwright, residence unstated, was on a list of letters remaining in the Savannah Post Office 
    Occupation  15 Oct 1805  Bulloch County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Daniel was elected Sheriff of Bulloch County on 15 October 1805 and received his commission from Governor John Milledge on 19 November 1805. He still was Sheriff of Bulloch County in 1807, as is indicated by a sale of land by Daniel in his position as sheriff. He also placed a number of advertisements in Georgia newspapers with notices of property auctions to satisfy debts. 
    Residences  3 Dec 1805  Bulloch County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    His residence in Bulloch County by 3 December 1805 because he was a witness to a sale of land by Thomas Mikell, of Bulloch County, to Sharrod McCall, also of Bulloch County. 
    Residences  1 May 1806  Georgia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Daniel Boatright was a purchaser of articles at John Kirkland Senr.'s estate sale on 1 May 1806. 
    Died  Abt 1818  Emanuel County, Georgia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • An Emanuel County court record of 7 September 1818 authorizes James Walea, Administrator of Daniel?s estate, to make an inventory of the estate. The appraisal of his personal property was made on 17 October 1818.
    • 500 acres of Daniel's land was sold in 1821 to Thomas Kent by James Walea as Administrator of Daniel?s estate.
    Buried  Abt 1818  Emanuel County, Georgia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Daniel BOATRIGHT, ca. 1760?-1812/8?

      When and where Daniel Boatright was born is unknown, and his parentage remains even more uncertain. The Reubin Boatright Family Bible, purportedly the oldest extant family document, sheds no light on these basic items of personal identification.

      There are at least five published opinions on Daniel?s origins. The most widely circulated and most quoted of these publications is the work of Folks Huxford, a judge and professional genealogist. He asserted that Daniel, the ?? Revolutionary War ancestor of a number of Wiregrass Georgians, was born about 1740 and as thought, in South Carolina. He was a resident of Beaufort District, S.C., before moving to Georgia.?

      An anonymous opinion also was given in a newspaper article honoring Daniel as a Revolutionary soldier. The article stated:

      Daniel Boatright was born in Cumberland County,
      Va., fighting in Georgia during the Revolution in
      battles in and around Savannah and Sunbury. After
      the war he settled in Burke which was cut into
      Emanuel when the county was formed in 1812.

      Brooks Blitch III, a descendant of Daniel, citing the research of Miriam Thomas Hickman, offers a third possibility. He stated:

      Daniel Boatright was born in Virginia between
      1760-1762. He lived in Buckingham and Cumberland
      counties, as did his brothers, Reubin, John,
      Charles, and William. His father, John, and his
      grandfather, William, also lived there. William
      Boatright, the grandfather of Daniel Boatright R.
      S., was born in 1713.

      Reflecting the words of Blitch, Robin Boatright Merrill has written:

      Daniel Boatright was born in Cumberland County,
      Virginia, in 1762. As a young boy of about 15 or
      16, Daniel was recruited by Captain John Mosby of
      Virginia to join a company, made up in Virginia, to
      march to Georgia to fight the British who were
      over-running Georgia. He was engaged in battles in
      and around Savannah and Sunbury.
      After the war, Daniel Boatright settled in
      Georgia....

      Another widely circulated opinion, by Norman Hurd Ricker and William E. Boatright, is that Daniel was born in 1745 in Beaufort District, South Carolina, a son of Margaret Dyer and Thomas Boatwright Sr. According to these researchers, Daniel had three brothers: William, born 1725 in Hanover County, Virginia, and died in Chesterfield County, South Carolina; Thomas, born 1735 in Hanover County and died 30 July 1802 in Chesterfield County, South Carolina; and, Lewis, born 1741 in Hanover County, and died in Marion County, South Carolina.

      Furthermore, these researchers state, with some uncertainty, that Daniel?s ancestry was as follows:

      Daniel?s parents were Margaret Dyer and Thomas
      Boatwright Sr. She was born in 1725 in Virginia and
      died after 1776 in Chesterfield County, South
      Carolina. Thomas Jr. was born in 1705 in New Kent
      County, Virginia and died 16 August 1776 in
      Chesterfield County. They married in Virginia about
      1725.
      Thomas Boatwright Sr. was a son of Sarah Dyer
      and John Boatwright III. Sarah was born in 1701 in
      York County, Virginia, a daughter of Mary Taylor
      and William Dyer. John III was born 1680 in
      Virginia and died in New Kent, Virginia. They
      married about 1701.
      John Boatwright III was a son of John
      Boatwright Jr. and Elizabeth. John Jr. and
      Elizabeth were married in 1676 in Virginia. She was
      born 1646 in England, and died in Virginia. John
      Jr. was born 1635 in Fressingfield, Suffolk County,
      England, and died after 1704 in Virginia.
      John Jr. was a son of Elizabeth Cropley and
      John Boatwright Sr. They were married 10 December
      1632 in St. Mary the Great Cathedral, Cambridge,
      England. She was born 1610 in Cambridge, England.
      John Sr. was born February 23, 1607 in
      Fressingfield, Suffolk County, England.

      Yet other opinions are widely circulated through the internet. George Boatwright has a website, The Boat(wright) Family Genealogy in America, that deals with a number of Boatright/Boatwright families. He states that ?our? Daniel was born about 1762 in Hanover County, Virginia and died 1818 in Emanuel County, GA. He married Margaret Braswell about 1789 in Burke County, GA. According to his website, Daniel had the following children: Betsey, born 1790; Mary, born 1791 and died 9 March 1877 in Monroe County, Alabama; Reubin, born 14 February 1794 and died 13 December 1878; Permelia, born 1797, married Daniel Hall; Nancy, born 1800; Charles, born 1805; and, John, born 1806.

      Much of what he says about Daniel has been said by many others. He, however, states that Daniel was a son of John Boatwright IV who was born about 1702 in New Kent County, Virginia and died about 1775 in Hanover County, Virginia. His wife has not been identified.

      George Boatwright continues Daniel?s ancestry as follows: John Boatwright IV was the son of John Boatwright III and Sarah Dyer in 1701. John III was born about 1680 in Virginia and died at an unknown date and place. Sarah Dyer was born about 1683, the daughter of Mary Taylor and William Dyer. The rest of his information duplicates that of Norman H. Ricker, as cited above. He does add the following:

      There is no conclusive evidence that Daniel is the
      son of John. It is my best guess is that Daniel
      fits into John's line, due to DNA testing that has
      eliminated many of the other Virginia Boatwright
      lines as possibilities. Additional DNA testing may
      resolve the question of how Daniel fits into the
      other Boatwright family lines.

      Which of the above propositions is correct, or if any is, remains to be documented more fully. None of the publications provide adequate source materials or citations for a proper evaluation and analysis of the assertions.

      A Daniel Boatright served as a private in the 2nd Georgia Continental Battalion, Co. B, during the Revolutionary War. The National Archives? military service files indicate that Daniel Boatright was on a payroll and his ?Pay has been drawn to the 1st January 1779.?

      A Danl. Boatwright was enlisted in Captain John Mosby?s Company on 18 December 1776. He was entered on that company?s pay roll, which dated from 22 August 1776 to 1 April 1777.

      Although the ?Georgia? Daniel died before pensions were made available in 1820, Joseph Terry, of Patrick County, Virginia, applied for his pension on 11 October 1832. He was a private and was included with Daniel on the 1 April 1777 and the 1 January 1779 pay lists. Terry made the following statements in his pension application:

      ? he enlisted in the army of the United States in
      the year 1775 the October after he was fourteen
      years of age with Capt. John Mosby who was attached
      to the 2nd. Regiment Commanded by Col. Alberd. he
      was a resident at the time of enlistment of the
      County of Buckingham and State of Virginia, and in
      December following he with other recruits march?d to
      Cumberland old Courthouse. Jacob Winfree was 1st.
      Lieutenant, John Clark 2nd. and Robert Mosby ensign
      to the said Company. About three weeks after that
      the Company marched from Cumberland Old Courthouse
      through the State of North Carolina & South Carolina
      to the Town of Savannah within the State of Georgia,
      and was there attached to the 2nd. Regiment above
      stated under the Command of Col. Elberd and to the
      Brigade of General Howe where we remained in and
      about 12 months when the 2nd Regiment was ordered by
      the commanding general to march to Florida in order
      to dislodge the British from St. Augustine which
      they then held possession of. That they pursued
      their march till they arrived within sight of St.
      Johns river, where they were met by an express
      informing them that the provision ships which had
      been sent on to meet the Regiment were all captured
      by the enemy. They then retreated back to Savannah
      and suffered very seriously for provisions having to
      pass through wilderness Country where rations could
      not be procured. They however got back.

      The pension application of Thomas Baker also includes a description of his service which is similar to that of Terry?s. Baker states that he:

      enlisted a soldier for the term of three years on
      the 16 day of October 1776 in the State of Virginia
      at Cumberland Court house, for the State of Georgia
      by Captain John Clarke, & transferred to the Company
      Commanded by Captain John Mosby in the Regiment
      Commanded by General Samuel Elbert; in the Second
      Company Second Regiment, Georgia Battalion in the
      line of the State of Georgia, on the Continental
      Establishment. That he continued to serve in the
      same Corps until two years, & one day from the date
      of his first enlistment under Mosby; and then he
      enlisted during the war at Augusta in the State of
      Georgia under Captain Hancock (Mosby having resigned
      & died and Col. Stirk commanding the Regiment in
      which he last enlisted). That he continued to serve
      under the same Colonel, until the Colonel was killed
      between Savannah and Sunbury, & under his successor
      Colonel Brown until the End of the War. ? That he
      was in the battles of Savannah, Stono, Altamahay, in
      two battles at the same place, Fort Toney on St.
      Mary's River, Amelia Island, Carney's Cowpens,
      Ebenezer, and many other places: That he saw Colonel
      Scrivener or Scriven shot down, & also Captain
      Winfield & also Captain Dogwood. He further states
      that he received a wound at Golphin's old Fort on
      the Savannah River in the left leg.

      If the ?Georgia? Daniel Boatright is the same as the Daniel who served in the 2nd Georgia Continental Battalion, then the above pension applications lend credence to the supposition that Daniel was born in or around Cumberland County, Virginia. Norman H. Ricker, however, believes that the Daniel Boatright who served in the 2nd Georgia died in Cumberland County about 1797.

      It also is possible that Daniel served in the South Carolina militia because a Daniel Boatwright was paid by the State of South Carolina on 27 October 1785 for 80 days of militia duty for a total of five pounds, fourteen shillings, three pence, and half penny sterling. The Roster of South Carolina Patriots states that Daniel Boatwright ?... served under Capt. John Chesnut in the militia and was at the fall of Charleston.?

      There is at least one other published account of Daniel?s Revolutionary War service. Arnold and Burnham state that Daniel ?Enlisted in 1779 in the 3rd Continental Battalion commanded by Lt. Colonel John McIntosh. He also served in Captain John Chestnutt?s Company of the South Carolina Militia and was at the fall of Charleston.?

      It is certain that Daniel served during the Revolutionary War because his widow was to participate in the land lotteries as a widow of a soldier. This will be discussed in more detail later.

      There, however, remains an additional military record for Daniel, but whether it is for Junior or Senior is unknown. On 5 November 1812, Daniel Boatwright ?Gentleman? was commissioned by the Governor as Ensign of the 49th district company of the militia.19 The 49th district was in Emanuel County when it was formed in December 1812.

      The earliest record I have found of Daniel being a resident of Georgia was a headright warrant of 200 acres of land in Burke County ?adj?g Lands of Thos. Chisolm & Benj. Brach.? The warrant was issued by Thos. Lewis, the Senior Justice of Burke County, on 4 December 1786. It was surveyed on 24 May 1787 and the plat noted that the warrant was issued to Daniel Boatright ?(who already resides in this State).?

      The Act of 22 February 1785, under which Daniel was granted the land, allowed a man to take up 200 acres upon his own headright, plus an additional 50 acres for each member of his family. Since Daniel received a grant of 200 acres, it is reasonable to assume that he was single and had no children or slaves at the time he made application for the warrant. On this basis, it is likely that Daniel was present in Georgia by 1785 even though the grant was not made until 1788.

      The 1785 land act also required no purchase price for the land, even though office fees and survey fees were levied. This provision opened up land settlement to many who could not afford the purchase of land, particularly younger men who were less likely to have accumulated wealth. If the South Carolina Daniel and the Georgia Daniel are the same individual, the payment received by him on 27 October 1785 for his South Carolina militia duty could have been used to pay office and survey fees on the land in Georgia.

      On 5 December 1791 Daniel received a headright warrant in Burke County for ?A tract of land which shall Contain, Two Hundred ???.. Acres, in the said County of Burke, Adjoining land formerly Surveyed for Cader Vineing & Hartsfield, on Harvey?s Mill Branch in lieu of a Warrant heretofore granted him for the Same quantity of Acres (on Rocky Branch).? No record of a previous warrant on Rocky Branch has been located, so it is probable that it was destroyed as required by law. The warrant was surveyed on 14 August 1792 ?for Daniel Boatwright who lives in This State.? The tract of land was located ?on a branch of Duharts Creek bounded northward by land of Vineing and Vacant land Northeast by unknown land, Southward by Survey.d land and Westward by land Supposed to have been survey.d for Hartsfield?.? The warrant was advertised and certified on 4 September 1792. This land lies in present day Jefferson County, northwest of Louisville, near the juncture of State Route 88, on Louisville Road.

      Daniel was married to Margaret Braswell, reputedly about 1786 in Burke County, Georgia. This date fits well with the headright grant. It is possible that he applied for the warrant prior to his marriage, thus qualifying for the 200 acres.

      Margaret is said to have been a daughter of Rhoda and Kindred Braswell (also a Revolutionary War soldier). The Reubin Boatright Bible and Huxford stated that Margaret was born in 1768. In addition, Huxford stated that Margaret might be Reubin?s second wife based upon the disparity of their ages. However, I have not located any record that substantiates the 1740 birth date Huxford attributed to Daniel, nor any evidence that he had another wife. On the contrary, if Daniel had been married previously and if he had children, I suspect that he would have gotten a larger grant of land ? unless, of course, any children by a first wife were adults by 1788.

      The names and numbers of Daniel and Margaret?s children also are points for disagreement among the Reubin Boatright Bible and Huxford, as well as between various applicants for membership in the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. The various attributed children are as follows:

      The Reubin Boatright Bible names children:
      Daniel Jr., Sarah, Reubin, Mary, Betsy, Charles,
      Nancy, and John.
      Huxford names children: Reubin, Permelia,
      Charles, and Nancy.
      Miriam Thomas Winsryg and Iris Faircloth
      Blitch name children: Daniel Jr., Reubin, Betsy,
      Mary, John, Charles, and Nancy.
      Robin Boatright Merrill names: Charles, Nancy,
      John, and Reubin.

      According to the above sources, nine individuals have been identified as children of Daniel. Of these nine, only four have a creditable circumstantial or documentable relationship:

      i. Reubin BOATRIGHT Sr.
      ii. Charles BOATRIGHT
      iii. Nancy BOATRIGHT
      iv. John BOATRIGHT

      The other reputed five children, Daniel Jr., Sarah, Mary, Betsey, and Permelia, are discussed in separate histories. Basic information on these individuals is introduced and evaluated. The author?s conclusions for stating that they are not children of Daniel Boatright are presented with the hope that future research will present more conclusive evidence as to their parentage.

      On 31 December 1794 Daniel Boatwright, of Burke County, bought a tract of land comprised of 200 acres on the Great Ogeechee River in Effingham County from Joel Rees, also of Burke County. At that date Effingham and Burke Counties were adjacent, so it is possible that the purchased tract was near the 1788 land grant. It also is of interest that the Old River Road, which paralleled the Ogeechee River, was the site chosen by many early settlers migrating into Georgia.

      Daniel next is recorded among the Burke Countians who, in 1795, signed a petition protesting the Yazoo land frauds. He then received another land grant of 200 acres in Burke County in 1797. This last grant might have been made because of his marriage and subsequent children. Tax records also record him as owning one slave and living in ?Waynesborough,? Burke County in October 1798.

      Daniel also served as a jailer (or gaoler) in Waynesboro, Burke County from 30 April 1796 through at least 3 March 1798. This position as a jailer was noted in the The Augusta Chronicle and Gazette of the State in a series of legal notices dealing primarily with run-away slaves. Daniel also had custody of a number of murderers, horse thieves, and other prisoners while he was jailer. Several of these prisoners made at least three attempts to escape from jail. Some of his experiences were noted in The Augusta Chronicle which recorded Daniel?s testimony at the trial of John Hume Menderson in the Burke County Superior Court on 11 March 1797.

      In reference to Daniel?s serving as a jailer, it seems to me that such an occupation would support a birth date closer to 1760 than the 1745 date. Such an occupation, requiring vigorous activity at times, would be more in line with that of a younger man.

      On 27 September 1798, Daniel, of Burke County, purchased 100 acres in Bulloch County ?formerly Effingham? from James Mizell and his wife Eleanore of Bulloch County. This tract also was located on the Ogeechee River. It is possible that the above mentioned Burke, Effingham, and Bulloch land parcels were contiguous.

      Daniel was elected Coroner of Burke County and received his commission from Governor James Jackson on 21 October 1799. On 18 February 1799, the General Assembly appropriated $29 for his services as coroner of Burke County, so he must have being serving as coroner prior to his commission.

      Daniel was still residing in Bulloch County by 1802 because the records show that he, Daniel Boatwright, witnessed a sale of land from Mark Lott to James Oglesby on 27 November 1802. Then, on 21 March 1803, Daniel purchased another 200 acres in Bulloch County from David Mizell and his wife Sarah of Bulloch County. This land was located in Bulloch County adjacent to and on the south side of the 1798 purchase, and also was bounded by lands of Mizell and Lotts. These purchases indicate that Daniel probably was staying in the same area, or the Mizell and Lotts families also were moving around with him. The first proposition is more likely correct.

      Daniel then exercised his right to participate in the 1805 Georgia land lottery, but drew two blanks in this effort to obtain more free land. His residence was given as Bulloch County in extant lottery records, which meant that he was located in Bulloch County between May 1803 and 1 March 1804. The fact that he was entitled to two draws in that lottery indicates that he was married and/or had a child or children under the age of 21 years of age.

      On 28 June 1805 Daniel Boatwright, residence unstated, was on a list of letters remaining in the Savannah Post Office.

      His residence still was in Bulloch County by 3 December 1805 because he was a witness to a sale of land by Thomas Mikell, of Bulloch County, to Sharrod McCall, also of Bulloch County. The records next show that Daniel Boatright was a purchaser of articles at John Kirkland Senr.?s estate sale on 1 May 1806.

      Daniel was elected Sheriff of Bulloch County on 15 October 1805 and received his commission from Governor John Milledge on 19 November 1805. He still was Sheriff of Bulloch County in 1807, as is indicated by a sale of land by Daniel in his position as sheriff. He also placed a number of advertisements in Georgia newspapers with notices of property auctions to satisfy debts.

      It is reasonable to assume that Daniel was able to read and write in order to carry out the functions of the various offices he held. Indeed, the 1807 deed executed by Daniel as sheriff, indicates that he signed his name. He also was still receiving letters in the Savannah post office in October 1810. Since schools were infrequently established in the South and a reliance was placed on hiring tutors, the significance of Daniel?s literacy might be helpful in separating him from other individuals with the same name, as well as indicating a social status for him and his family. The fact that he held these two offices does indicate a fairly high standing in the community because at that time both offices, particularly Sheriff, had more influence and social standing than generally is recognized by today?s society.

      The extant Emanuel County land records do not indicate any purchases or sales of land by Daniel himself ? only a sale by the administrator of his estate ? but court house fires destroyed many Emanuel County records. It also is difficult, if not impossible, to determine if he had sold the Burke County land because a court house fire destroyed the pre-1860 Burke County records. If Daniel retained all of the land received by grant or through purchase, he would have had a total of over 1400 acres. The absence of adult sons and/or a number of slaves to work the land mitigates against his retention of such large holdings unless he had the means to pay taxes on the land. Yet, his personal property revealed in estate records provide no clues to a possible occupation other than farming, and even that appears to have been small-scale. We are left to wonder if Daniel could be counted among the numerous Georgians who were involved in the NASDAQ of that day ? land speculation. The probabilities are that he used the land as cowpens and/or for timber related purposes. Both types of land usage were very common in the ?pine barrens? area at that time.

      Huxford states that Daniel died in 1812 based upon Margaret?s appointment as guardian of their two minor children, Charles and Nancy, on 3 September 1812. However, I have not been able to locate this record. If we set aside the 1812 Ensign commission mentioned previously, the absence of Daniel?s name in extant post-1812 records seems, at first blush, to support the 1812 death date. However, a 1818 time frame for his death is supported by Emanuel County court records. A court record of 7 September 1818 authorizes James Walea, Administrator of Daniel?s estate, to make an inventory of the estate. The appraisal of his personal property was made on 17 October 1818.

      Under Georgia?s laws in effect at the time of his death, Daniel?s estate would have been divided equally between Margaret and his children unless Margaret chose to retain her dower rights. If she chose the dower right option, she would have received a third of the land. I have not located any land records that indicate a formal partition of Daniel?s land among his heirs, but 500 acres was sold in 1821 to Thomas Kent by James Walea as Administrator of Daniel?s estate. The sale raises additional questions about the amount of land Daniel owned at his death, how the proceeds of the sale of the 500 acres were distributed, and whether or not all of the heirs were living in 1821. Also, the estate sale might indicate that some of the children had reached the age of majority which might have required the sale to settle their inheritance. Much more research needs to be done to assist with possible answers to these and other questions.

      The estate records also indicate that Daniel and his family were ?middle-class? for that day and place because among the items sold were a shotgun, a mare and colt, a looking-glass, and bed. The other items sold, such as a loom and ?ploughs,? are typical of life in a very rural southern community at that period of time.

      Daniel?s burial place is no more certain than the date of his death. According to family stories, he was buried on his farm in a plot by the Savannah road near Herndon, east of McKinney's Pond. The exact location of his grave is lost from memory. A memorial plaque commemorating his Revolutionary War service was placed at Hawhammock Church, near Swainsboro, on 27 June 1993.

      After Daniel?s death, Margaret was listed as head of household in the 1820 Emanuel County census. Although the 1820 census lists numbers of individuals in age categories for members of the household rather than individual names, the oldest female probably was Margaret since she is listed as head of household. Her age in the census is given as 45 or older, indicating birth prior to 1775. Given the published marriage date of 1788, the birth of her son Reubin in 1794 and the birth of John, the youngest child, reputedly in 1812 or 1818, Margaret probably was born between 1760 and 1770. The Reuben Boatright Family Bible states that she was born in 1768.

      Included with Margaret in the 1820 census was a male between 10 and 16 years, a female under 10 years, and a female between 16 and 26 years. When dealing with possible secondhand information from the census, particularly during these early years, we deal with much speculation. We can assume that the three individuals enumerated with Margaret were three of her youngest children. However, all of the age categories do not match the birth dates reported in Huxford?s publications, nor in the Boatright Bible.

      Margt. Boatwright (Widow), a resident of Military District 49 (located in the northeast corner of present-day Emanuel County), was a fortunate drawer in the 1820 Georgia Land lottery and received land in Irwin County. What happened to this land? It should be noted that her son Reuben paid taxes on land in the 11th district of Irwin County in 1841. This is another area of research to be pursued.

      The 1821 land lottery offers an additional bit of confusion and a tantalizing possibility because a Margaret Boatright (Widow), a resident of McClendons Military District in Laurens County, had two successful draws for land in Dooley County. In addition, Charles and Nancy Boatright, orphans of Daniel Boatright and residents of the same place, had two successful draws in the 1821 lottery: one in Fayette County and the other in Monroe County. Is it coincidence that the names of Daniel and Margaret appear together in the same place? Was this another family in Laurens County with the same names? Since Margaret was a fortunate drawer in the 1820 land lottery, she should not have been qualified to draw lots in 1821. In addition, under the law of the time, the orphans of Daniel were eligible to draw only if they were minors and the father and mother were dead. If the birth dates of Charles and Nancy are correct as they appear in the Boatright Bible, their ages would have qualified them for the lottery. However, if their mother was still living, they could not be orphans. Given the fact that Margaret was not located in the Emanuel County 1830 census, it is possible that she and the three children had moved to Laurens County while Reubin remained in Emanuel County, but this does not explain why she was able to participate in the lottery again if the two records are for the same individual. Research in the land records of these counties might provide additional information.
      Margaret Boatwright paid annual taxes in 1824 as a resident of Emanuel County. She definitely was a resident of Emanuel County at that date because state law, until 1847, required that taxes be paid in the county of residence.

      Huxford also states that Margaret drew land in the 1827 land lottery ?as the widow of a Revolutionary Soldier.? The Official Register of Land Lottery of Georgia 1827 does indicate that Margaret Boatright, of Emanuel County, was a fortunate drawer on 10 May 1827. She received land in Captain McGars District (No. 224, District 14) in Lee County on 10 May 1827 at the 56th day?s drawing. The notation ?w. R. S.?, meaning ?widow of a Revolutionary Soldier,? on the record indicates that she was just that. However, the original records, housed at the Georgia Department of Archives and History, need to be examined to make certain that the notation was part of the original record. Another needed area of research is to determine if any other Lee County land records can be tied to Margaret and/or her children. Nancy Boatright, a resident of the 57th District, Emanuel County, orphan, also drew a successful lot (No. 194, District 3, Section 4, Coweta County) in the 1827 land lottery.72 Charles Boatright, a resident of Corkers District, Burke County, also drew a successful lot (No. 105, District 2, Section 5, Carroll County).

      In addition to the above land lottery records, a Margaret Boatwright, a resident of Wilkinson County, was a drawer in Georgia?s 1832 Gold Lottery for land in District 20, Section 3, Lot # 821. This individual is probably not the Emanuel County Margaret because a note beside her name stated that her husband was absent ? not deceased. This record also adds to our belief that there was more than one Margaret Boatright living in that area of Georgia at the same time.

      Margaret was not located as head of household in the Emanuel County 1830 and 1840 censuses. However, in the 1840 census there was a female in the 70-80 year old category enumerated in the household of Reuben Boatright; it is possible that this was his mother Margaret. It is interesting to note that there were only seven females of that age category in all of Emanuel County in 1840. Whether this statistic helps with increasing the probabilities of identification remains for future research. However, the DAR application papers of Miriam Thomas Winsryg Hickman state that Margaret died about 1830 and the Boatright Bible gives her death date as 1838. Huxford states that Margaret died about 1840 and was buried beside her husband.
    Person ID  I1  Boatright Genealogy
    Last Modified  14 Nov 2013 

    Family  Margaret BRASWELL,   b. Abt 1768,   d. Abt 1840, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  Abt 1789 
    Children 
    >1. Reuben BOATRIGHT, Sr.,   b. 14 Feb 1794, Burke County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Dec 1878, Emanuel County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Nancy BOATRIGHT,   b. Abt 1800, Burke County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Charles BOATRIGHT,   b. Abt 1805, Burke County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. John BOATRIGHT,   b. Abt 1812, Bulloch County, GA Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified  10 Aug 2010 
    Family ID  F4  Group Sheet


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